Monthly Archives: February 2013

Delete that photo!

A  friend whose opinion I respect forwarded me a photo taken when I did not — shall we say — look my best. It got me thinking:  Does this require action?  Should I tighten up my reputation management?  Get a makeover?  What do geezer rockers do about this sort of thing?  Does Robert Plant worry about his hair?  Closed eyes?

Can it get any worse?  Add wrinkles!

Can it get any worse? Always!

We are well on our way in an era of visual communication.  Some people are blessed with telegenic looks and would shine climbing out of a dumpster. Does the way Nigella Lawson looks sell cookbooks?  Of course.  For the rest of us, it’s luck of the draw (or click).  Forget command and control.  I once worked with a top-ranking executive who, confronted with an unflattering photo, dispatched his minions to buy up every available copy of the trade mag in which it appeared, a feat that can never be repeated.  As for prep, the jury’s out. I recently caught myself  reaching over to sort out a no-nonsense entrepreneur’s hair (female).  She’d probably been up since 4 that morning. Working.  Personally, I think candid photography before 9 a.m. is cruel and unusual punishment.

What does our appearance say about us?  My mother, raised a Texas girl, never poured her coffee or opened a newspaper until her lipstick and hair were in place.  I can’t remember a time when she didn’t look beautiful.  Then again, I remember Hillary Clinton’s eulogy at Gov. Ann Richards’ funeral less for what she said (although it was memorable: she touched on just this subject) than that she looked exhausted — like she’d worked all night and still cared enough to show up and honor someone who’d been important to her.

As for me, I’m leaning in the direction of a well-developed sense of humor. That may be the point.

Sitting is the new smoking

A friend gave me the news: Researchers have discovered there is no way to compensate for sitting.  Forget the morning run, yoga, walking the dog, weights. Sitting is the new smoking.

My back and shoulder had warned me. I felt long fingers of gravity pulling me down in the chair, tugging my thoughts and hopes down with them.  Down, down, down.  A change was in order.  A new $500 chair?  An iPad?  Everything investment is a risk.

So I did what any risk-aware 21st century American would do:  I posted my gorgeous Amisco computer desk on Craigslist and waited. I waited and forgot about the desk.  Weeks later, two emails popped up, out of the blue.  Lo and behold, there was a market for the desk.

What to do?  Go with the flow.  Linelle pulled out her $65. cash and took the desk away.  I think she’ll give it a good home.  And when I turned to look at the vacant spot, I had a rush of hope.  So many possibilities!  I could put a table in the middle of the room to use for cut outs and thinking.  I could type standing up (my back had been hurting anyway).  I could rethink my entire working life.

So here I am, in my new phase:  typing on the top of a tiny old bookcase my mother kept in her bathroom.  It’s the right height but a little teetery.  I’ll have to look for a larger surface. I’ll have to innovate.

Change is good. It never comes when we expect or even want it.  But it’s good.